Hall of Fame


Raymond S. Andrecheck  B.Sc., P.Eng.

Ray Andrecheck graduated from the Haileybury School of Mines in 1936. After gaining significant industrial mining experience, he joined the faculty in 1969 where he taught Surveying, Strength of Materials, and Math. Ray Andrecheck died in 1975 at the age of fifty-seven years. He was inducted into the HSM Hall of Fame in June 1979.


Daniel W. Atchison  B.A., M.A., P.Eng., F.G.A.C.

Dan Atchison, known by most as ‘Jungle Dan’, started his teaching career at the Haileybury School of Mines in 1937 until its closure in 1943. Following the school’s reopening after World War II, Dan taught Geology and Mineralogy until his retirement in 1975. He was inducted into the HSM Alumni Hall of Fame in June 1979.


Allan L. Barry  B.Sc., P.Eng., F.G.A.C.

In 1958, Al Barry came to Haileybury to teach at the Provincial Institute of Mining. His teaching assignments primarily included Math, Physics, and Geophysics. Al eventually became the Assistant Dean of the Haileybury School of Mines. He was an avid ham radio operator and a bagpiper in the New Liskeard Legion Pipe Band. Al Barry died in 1983 and was inducted into the HSM Hall of Fame in 1995.


Donald Burke  B.Sc., P.Eng.

Don Burke was  a 1931 Mining Geology graduate of the University of Alberta and a military Major with four years of service with the Royal Canadian Engineers during World War II. He joined the faculty at Haileybury in 1962. Experienced in many aspects of mining and metallurgy, Don taught Chemistry for 13 years before his retirement in 1975. He was inducted into the HSM Hall of Fame in 2004.


John R. Craig  Ph.D., C.M., D.C.L., Order of Canada 1996

John Craig graduated from the Provincial Institute of Mining in 1953. A later graduate of Dalhousie University, he eventually became the President and Chief Executive Officer of Nova Scotia Tractors & Equipment. John also received his doctorate of Civil Law from the University of King’s College in Halifax. For his philanthropic work in the arts community in Nova Scotia, John was bestowed the Order of Canada in 1996.


Jack Middleton Cunningham-Dunlop  P.Eng.

Jack Dunlop, a 1921 Haileybury Mining School graduate, easily stands out as one of the most successful engineers and executives in the history of Canadian mining. By 1949, he was appointed vice-president of Ventures Ltd., and controlled 160 mining companies with over 10,000 employees, including Falconbridge Nickel Mines Ltd. Jack Dunlop’s passion for mining business opportunities continued until his untimely death in 1970.


William Henry Durrell  P.Eng.

Bill Durrell graduated from Haileybury in 1921 and is considered one of the most acclaimed graduates of the early School of Mines. A born leader with a strong determination for progress, Durrell’s work in the iron ore fields of Quebec and Labrador was one of many mammoth projects he undertook during his career. In 1954, Bill Durrell was appointed Vice-President of the Iron Ore Company of Canada and was instrumental in the completion of the railway link from Sept- Iles, Quebec to Labrador. Bill Durrell died in 1963 at the age of 59.


John D. Frey  B.A.Sc., B.ED., P.Eng.

John n `Jack` Frey arrived in Haileybury in 1954 as the newest faculty member with the Provincial Institute of Mining. By 1967 he was appointed Dean of the Haileybury School of Mines until his retirement in 1989. Jack was very involved in all aspects of the school as well as his community. He received many medals and awards of distinction for his service in the mining educational field. He was inducted into the HSM Hall of Fame in 1995. John Frey died in 2002.


Patricia Gilroy-Schaefer

Pat Schaefer joined the Provincial Institute of Mining in 1952 as a clerical secretary. She eventually became Secretary to the Dean and after 33 years of service to the school, retired in 1985. Patricia Schaefer died in 2004. In recognition for her passionate work and commitment to the success of the Haileybury School of Mines, a memorial bursary was set up in her honour.


Murray B. Glazier  M.C.I.M.

Murray Glazier began his teaching career in 1929 when the mining program was under the direction of Haileybury High School. At the time he taught Mining, Physics, Surveying, and Drafting. Murray rejoined the faculty following the school’s reopening in 1945 and continued teaching until 1957. Murray Glazier died in 1964.


Arthur H. Kingsmill  B.A.Sc., P.Eng.

Art Kingsmill, an assayer by trade, joined the faculty of the Provincial Institute of Mining in 1945, following its reopening after World War II. In May 1948, the 34 year-old teacher was tragically killed while working at the school. Arthur Kingsmill was inducted into the HSM Alumni Hall of Fame in 1970.


Robert ‘Bud’ W. Mancantelli  P.Eng.

Bud Mancantelli’s arrival to Haileybury in 1966 was later in his life but with that came a vast wealth of industrial experience in Extractive Metallurgy. Bud taught Ore Dressing and Milling until his retirement in 1977. In 1972, he received the appointment of Senior Teaching Master from the Council of Regents of the Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology. Robert Mancantelli died in 1983 and was inducted into the HSM Hall of Fame in 2004.


John Mateer

John Mateer, a 1936 Queen’s University graduate and a Lieutenant with four years of service with the Royal Canadian Engineers during World War II, started his teaching career at the Haileybury School of Mines in 1966. John’s wealth of experience as a surveyor, geologist, and miner was an asset in his assigned subjects of Mining and Math. He retired in 1978, and died in 1985.


Hugh Moore  MT, P.Eng.

Hugh ‘Hughie’ Moore graduated from the Provincial Institute of Mining in 1951. Working as a geologist in the area, Hugh is credited as the driving force within the HSM Alumni Association. His work with the alumni spanned over 50 years until his death in 2004. Hugh was a proud veteran of World War II and Life member of the C.I.M.M., Prospector’s Association, and Professional Engineers of Ontario. Hugh Moore was inducted into the HSM Hall of Fame in 1995.


Napoleon ‘Paul’ Morissette

Paul Morissette, of Haileybury, is best known as the original founder and owner of Morissette Diamond Drilling Ltd., one of the world’s most prolific diamond drill contractors since 1926. Paul also took an active role in the interest of the Provincial Institute of Mining and School of Mines as an Advisory Board member from 1944 until his death in 1968.


Alex C. Mosher

Alex Mosher, famous Canadian prospector and mine finder, gave much of his time as an Advisor to the School of Mines. Alex sat as a Haileybury municipal councillor and was also former President of the Prospectors and Developers of Canada. For his dedication, he was also inducted into the Canadian Mining Hall of Fame in 1990. Alex Mosher died in 1993.


Herb Pickard

Herb Pickard began his teaching career at the Mining School in 1919 upon completion of the new mill building. He taught Milling, Surveying, and Drafting. Pickard left the school in 1924 but rejoined the faculty in 1945, for a three-year period, to teach the large classes of students from the Department of Veterans Affairs, who arrived after the Second World War. Herb Pickard died in 1965.


William S. Tuke

Bill Tuke was the second principal of Haileybury High School and the Haileybury Mining School from 1920 to 1943. Described by many as an excellent disciplinarian, Tuke was instrumental in bringing many new positive developments to the program including a new mill building and a large expansion to the facility in 1931.


Clarence W. Tyson  B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc., P.Eng.

Clarence ‘Plumbob’ Tyson began his teaching career in 1945 under the new Provincial Institute of Mining. His subjects included English and Shop but during his 24 years at the school, he was best remembered for his skills in Surveying. Clarence was inducted into the HSM Hall of Fame in 1970. Clarence Tyson died in 1971 in Owen Sound, Ontario.


Ossian ‘Ossie’ Edward Walli  B.Sc., P.Eng.

Ossie Walli arrived in 1945 as the first principal of the Provincial Institute of Mining. In 1967, Ossie was appointed the first President of Northern College and later retired in 1969, concluding a 44-year career in education. Ossian Walli died in 1991. In honour of his exhaustive work to raise the stature of the school and give it world-wide acclaim, he received an honorary doctorate degree and was inducted into the Canadian Mining Hall of Fame in 1993.


Murray Edmund Watts  C.M., B.Sc., P.Eng., Order of Canada

Murray Watts, born in Cobalt, graduated from the Haileybury Mining School in 1929. His impressive lifetime accomplishments in mining and exploration have significantly contributed to HSM’s proud distinction as a premier mining institute. . In 1981, Murray was made a lifetime member of the C.I.M.M. and was bestowed the Order of Canada. He was later inducted into the Canada Mining Hall of Fame. Murray Watts was tragically killed in an automobile accident in 1982.


W.A. Wilson  B.A.

Asbury Wilson, the first principal of Haileybury High School and School of Mines from 1910 to 1920, is credited as the visionary for the Haileybury Mining School. Primarily through his efforts and the assistance of local miners, Wilson set up part-time mining classes in 1912. In 1914, the Department of Education granted Haileybury High School permission to offer a three-year mining diploma program. Asbury Wilson died in 1954.